« Squrriel Rampage | Main | Nosing Around »

October 06, 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451d16769e20120a5c6de42970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Ups And Downs:

Comments

AH

This genius co-worker of mine gave me a squirrel-proof tip for your corn. I used it for my tomatoes and it worked like a gem. Here's what you do:

-Get some old or unused CD's that you won't plan on using for their intended purpose.
-Take a piece of yarn, rope, hemp, string, etc. and run it through the middle of the disc.
-Then hang the CD near the corn or hang it from the corn itself. The sun will reflect off of the non-labeled side and the disc will spin around in the wind. Squirrels hate shiny things and movement. Should do the trick, try it out.

Soilman

Liz hi

I gave up on tomatoes at the allotment; too heartbreaking. They just got blight every year, along with everyone else's. I'm sure it's the right decision to grow them at home instead.

Gabrielle Anderson

Blight is a big problem here too in Brittany and most people who grow tomatoes outside make them a bit of a mini shelter with small stakes and clear plastic, sort of half greenhouse/mini bus shelter kind of thing. Its difficult to describe but it stops them getting wet and protects them from the prevailing wind on one side. They say the blight arrives in the rain (?) You probably know already that you shouldn't grow any tomato family crop on the blighted patch for several years.
I know what you mean about the end of one season and the beginning of another. I have said to a few people that I am almost looking forward to winter for the rest it brings and they look at me as if I am completely mad!!

Jo

You've had some great successes, and everyone has things that don't do so well.
My sweetcorn was a disaster this year, but my strawberries and beans have been the biggest successes.

The comments to this entry are closed.